Free Webinar: What Works? Evidence-Based Tobacco Treatments

Posted by Lesley Copeland

Aug 26, 2015 11:50:58 AM

TCalifornia_Smokers_Hotline_43he California Smokers’ Helpline and its training and technical assistance arm, the Center for Tobacco Cessation, are pleased to host this free webinar on Wednesday, September 2nd from 1 to 2 pm PST, What Works? Evidence-Based Tobacco Treatments, presented by Scott E. Sherman, MD, MPH, Associate Professor of Population Health, Medicine and Psychiatry at New York University School of Medicine and Co-Chief of the Section of Tobacco, Alcohol and Drug Use.

Register Now!

Webinar Overview

According to the Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence Clinical Practice Guideline, 2008 Update, tobacco dependence interventions, if delivered in a timely and effective manner, significantly reduce the smoker’s risk of suffering from smoking-related disease. Indeed, “it is difficult to identify any other condition that presents such a mix of lethality, prevalence, and neglect, despite effective and readily available interventions.”

So, what are effective treatments for tobacco use? Dr. Sherman will provide the latest information on the common elements of effective interventions, including:

  • Epidemiology and Burden of Tobacco Use
  • Evidence - Based Treatment:
    • Clinical Practice Guidelines: updates on combination, pre-cessation, and long-term use
    • Behavioral Interventions
    • Brief discussion of pharmacotherapy
  • Q & A

About the Presenter

Photo-Scott_ShermanAfter receiving his medical degree from New York University School of Medicine, Dr. Sherman completed a residency in Primary Care Internal Medicine at Bellevue Hospital Center/New York University Medical Center and then a research fellowship in General Internal Medicine at Boston University. Dr. Sherman joined the faculty at University of California, Los Angeles in 1991 and was a staff physician for the Veterans Health Administration (VA). In 2005, he transferred back to New York City, where he is currently Associate Professor of Population Health, Medicine and Psychiatry at New York University School of Medicine and Co-Chief of the Section of Tobacco, Alcohol and Drug Use.

Dr. Sherman’s area of interest in general is how to redesign health care systems to better help people quit smoking. He is particularly focused on Translational Studies, which examine the effectiveness of interventions in routine practice, as well as how to disseminate and implement them. Dr. Sherman is currently leading five major grants: 1) Effectiveness of smoking-cessation interventions for urban hospital patients (NIH/NHLBI), 2) Patterns of communication and information transfer among hookah users (NIH/NCI), 3) a mid-career mentoring award (K24 – NIH/NIDA), 4) Proactive outreach to smokers in VA Mental Health Clinics (VA Health Services Research and Development Service), and 5) NYU/Abu Dhabi Public Health Research Center.

Webinar Materials: Tips from the Field for Web-Based Referrals

Posted by Lesley Copeland

Aug 24, 2015 4:28:55 PM

August-2015-Post-Webinar-Kit-Images-WebIf you missed our webinar on August 19th, you can download our free kit now, which includes:

Webinar Recording & Slide Deck: Tips from the Field for Effectively Utilizing the Helpline's Web-Based Referral Service, presented by:

  • Diane Chung, RN, Quality Review & Patient Safety Officer, KPC Healthcare
  • Joseph Clement, RN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, San Francisco General Hospital
  • Brian Davis, California Tobacco Control Program (CTCP) Coordinator, Tri-City Health Center
  • Kristin Harms, Communications Manager for the California Smokers' Helpline

Web-Based Referral Form: Use this form to document a patient referral to the Helpline, including the patient's consent.

Patient Flyer: Hand this flyer to patients after referring them to the Helpline so they know what to expect.

Download Now!

To sign up for email notification of future webinars, please click here.

 

Free Webinar: Effectively Utilizing the Web-Based Referral Service

Posted by Lesley Copeland

Aug 6, 2015 5:05:00 PM

The California Smokers’ Helpline and its training and technical assistance arm, the Center for Tobacco Cessation, are pleased to host this free webinar on Wednesday, August 19th from noon to 1 pm PST,  Tips from the Field for Effectively Utilizing the Helpline's Web-Based Referral Service.

Register Now!

Webinar Overview

California_Smokers_Hotline_46Between the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Meaningful Use Criteria and the Joint Commission Tobacco Measure Set, there has never been a better time to develop and implement a system for referring patients who smoke to evidence-based tobacco treatment.

Join us for this free webinar to hear from leaders throughout California who have developed effective systems for referring their patients who smoke to the California Smokers' Helpline, utilizing the Helpline's free web-based referral service. In addition to describing their organization's services and patient population, each speaker will address:

  • How the web-based referral service is integrated into their clinical workflow
  • Keys to success
  • Challenges
  • Recommendations for other organizations wanting to implement a similar program

Featured Speakers

Our speakers represent top-referring inpatient and outpatient organizations from throughout California:

  • Diane Chung, RN, Quality Review & Patient Safety Officer, KPC Healthcare
  • Joseph Clement, RN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, San Francisco General Hospital
  • Brian Davis, California Tobacco Control Program (CTCP) Coordinator, Tri-City Health Center

I hope you can join us for this informative webinar with hands-on strategies from experts in the field for implementing an effective web-based referral system.

Free Kit: Top Tips for Motivating Patients to Quit

Posted by Lesley Copeland

Jul 20, 2015 2:14:00 PM

Motivating-Smokers-to-Quit-Kit-AdIf you missed our webinar on June 19th, Top Tips for Motivating Patients to Quit, presented by Dean Schillinger, MD, UCSF Professor of Medicine in Residence and a primary care physician at San Francisco General Hospital, and Gary Tedeschi, PhD, Clinical Director with the California Smokers' Helpline, you can download our free kit now, which includes:

  • Webinar Recording
  • Webinar Slide Deck
  • Q & A: Answers to questions from webinar participants
  • Flyer: How to Motivate Patients to Quit
Download Now!

Smokers have varying degrees of interest in and readiness to stop smoking, and it’s not always clear how best to boost motivation. In this one hour recorded webinar, Drs. Schillinger and Tedeschi provide participants with hands-on strategies for motivating patients to quit, including:

  • How to discuss tobacco cessation with patients
  • Ready-to-use tips to increase motivation such as:
    • instilling hope
    • conveying understanding
    • addressing ambivalence
    • reframing quitting “failures” as successes
    • encouraging patients’ own decision-making
    • assisting with a quit plan comprised of proven methods
  • Following up with patients to assess and maintain motivation

New! 2015 California Tobacco Facts and Figures

Posted by Kristin Harms

Jul 9, 2015 1:39:28 PM

2015-California-Facts-and-Figures-ImageThe California Department of Public Health  just released the latest California Tobacco Facts and Figures 2015, which provides a comprehensive look at tobacco control in California. This document includes the latest data available which is 2011 or 2013, depending on the survey.

California Facts and Figures 2015 includes data for:

  • Smoking prevalence
  • Tobacco consumption
  • Secondhand smoke
  • Cancer incidence and mortality
  • Tobacco industry spending vs. tobacco control funding
  • Smoking cessation
Download Report Now!

Medi-Cal Incentives to Quit Smoking (MIQS) to End

Posted by Susan Kratochvil

Jun 30, 2015 10:00:00 AM

patchThe Medi-Cal Incentives to Quit Smoking Project is excited to announce that as of May 1, 2015, over 43,000 smokers have enrolled to receive tobacco cessation counseling services, gift cards and free nicotine patches from the California Smokers' Helpline. The Helpline has received over 83,000 calls from Medi-Cal smokers during the project period from March 2012 through April 2015.

Due to the success of the project and the resulting high volume of calls to the Helpline, MIQS incentives are projected to end by July 31, 2015. After that date, Medi-Cal members are encouraged to continue to call the Helpline at 1-800-NO-BUTTS for free telephone tobacco cessation counseling services. 

Smokers may receive nicotine patches paid for by their Medi-Cal Managed Care Plan, when obtained through a pharmacy. Some callers may qualify for other incentives offered through special projects like CEASE California (for parents of children 0 to 5) and the Asian Smokers' Quitline. 

Here are some steps you can take to communicate to Medi-Cal members and providers about the end of the MIQS incentives: 

  • Notify Medi-Cal members and providers that the incentives (free nicotine patches and gift cards) will end by July 31, 2015.
  • Remind providers and health professionals to Ask, Advise and Refer smokers to the Helpline, and encourage them to sign up for the Helpline's Web-Based Referral Service.
  • Send providers and smokers to the Helpline's website for more information on special projects, provider training, and smoking cessation resources. 

The MIQS staff would like to thank our statewide and local partners for their contribution to the success of the project. Your partnership in promoting the project has made the difference in helping tens of thousands of Medi-Cal members to quit smoking, thereby improving their overall health status and reducing chronic disease rates.

Refer Patients to Free Materials

Raymond. Smoked for 37 Years. Quit in 2013.

Posted by Kristin Harms

Jun 23, 2015 10:00:00 AM

Raymond_St._Claire"I started smoking at age 16 and smoked for 37 years. I grew up in a househod where both parents smoked.

I found out about the Helpline from the television commercials. Your program has helped me to quit completely and give me back the gift of breathing again.

I feel empowered and in control now, and highly recommend this program to anyone who smokes. My counselor was there for me with any information and encouragement I needed.

Thank you so much. You guys ROCK!!!!"

Free Smokers' Helpline Services

New! Helpline Caller Demographic Reports

Posted by Cherrie Ng

Jun 17, 2015 1:00:00 PM

California_Smokers_Hotline_46The California Smokers' Helpline is now making demographic reports about Helpline callers available on our website. Reports will be published every six months for each county in California and will include aggregate data about Helpline callers including age, gender, ethnicity, language spoken, and referral source.

These reports are a good way to gauge your county's success in increasing cessation among tobacco users.

Download Reports Now!

The Helpline call reports page may also be accessed from the bottom of the Community Partners page.

Please feel free to contact me at y2ng@ucsd.edu  or (858) 300-1015 if you have any questions, or would like to know more about Helpline resources for increasing tobacco cessation in your county.

Free Webinar: Top Tips for Motivating Patients to Quit

Posted by Lesley Copeland

Jun 9, 2015 1:42:23 PM

California_Smokers_Hotline_37The California Smokers’ Helpline and its training and technical assistance arm, the Center for Tobacco Cessation, are pleased to host a free webinar, Top Tips for Motivating Patients to Quit, on Friday, June 19th from noon to 1 pm PST.

Featured speakers will be Dean Schillinger, MD, Chief of the UCSF Division of General Internal Medicine at San Francisco General Hospital, and Gary Tedeschi, PhD, Clinical Director for the California Smokers' Helpline.

Register Now!

Webinar Overview

Smokers have varying degrees of interest in and readiness to quit smoking, and it’s not always clear how best to boost motivation. This webinar will provide participants with hands-on strategies for motivating patients to quit, including:

  • How to discuss tobacco cessation with patients
  • Ready-to-use tips to increase motivation such as:
    • instilling hope
    • conveying understanding
    • addressing ambivalence
    • reframing quitting “failures” as successes
    • encouraging patients’ own decision-making
    • assisting with a quit plan comprised of proven methods
  • Following up with patients to assess and maintain motivation

About the Presenters

DeanSchillinger_288x314Dr. Schillinger is a UCSF Professor of Medicine in Residence and a primary care physician at San Francisco General Hospital (SFGH). He serves as Chief of the UCSF Division of General Internal Medicine at SFGH and directs the Health Communications Research Program in the UCSF Center for Vulnerable Populations. He has focused his research on health communication for vulnerable populations, carrying out a number of studies exploring the impact of limited health literacy on the care of patients with diabetes and heart disease. Dr. Schillinger contributed to the 2004 IOM Report on Health Literacy, authored a 2012 IOM Publication defining the attributes of Health Literate Healthcare Organizations, and has published over 170 peer-reviewed scientific articles in the field of health communication science. He was honored with the 2003 Institute for Healthcare Advancement Research Award, the 2008 Research Award in Safety and Quality from the National Patient Safety Foundation and the Bay Area Research Mentor of the Year Award in 2010. He co-created a youth-led diabetes prevention social media campaign called The Bigger Picture Campaign, which received the Latino Coalition for a Health California Award for Youth Leadership and the 2014 Spirit of 1848 Social Justice Award from the American Public Health Association (APHA). In 2013, he received the Everett M Rogers Award from APHA in recognition of his lifelong contributions to advancing the study and practice of public health communication.

Gary.1.25Dr. Tedeschi is a licensed psychologist (#PSY 14241) at the University of California-San Diego School of Medicine, Moores Cancer Center. He has worked there since 1994 as the Clinical Director of the California Smokers' Helpline and the Center for Tobacco Cessation. At the Helpline he is responsible for clinical supervision, counseling protocol development, counselor training, and continuing education. At the Center he provides technical assistance and training for medical and behavioral health professionals on tobacco cessation interventions. Dr. Tedeschi also has several years of previous clinical experience providing psychotherapy for individuals, couples and groups in settings including community mental health, psychiatric in-patient, and university counseling centers. He teaches graduate courses in counseling part time and maintains a small practice in consulting psychology. Dr. Tedeschi holds a Ph.D. in counseling psychology from the University of Missouri, Kansas City; an M.A. in counseling psychology from Boston College; and a B.A. in psychology from Kutztown University of Pennsylvania.

Guest Commentary-How to Motivate Patients and Clients to Quit Smoking

Posted by Dean Schillinger

Jun 2, 2015 3:59:00 PM

 

DeanSchillinger 288x314

Dean Schillinger, M.D. is UCSF Professor of Medicine in Residence, and a primary care physician at San Francisco General Hospital (SFGH). He serves as Chief of the UCSF Division of General Internal Medicine at SFGH, and directs the Health Communications Research Program in the UCSF Center for Vulnerable Populations.

The 4 Rs to Success

Recently, Dr. Steven Schroeder, national leader on smoking cessation from UCSF, and I had the privilege of performing in a short video encouraging clinicians to ask, advise and refer their patients to the California’s Smoker’s Helpline.

As is true for most instructional and motivational videos, a certain degree of oversimplification was required, or, as in this case, a decision was made to present a clinical interaction that compressed the time course of smoking cessation conversations into a shorter period of time than is often required.

In reality, seasoned clinicians know that successful smoking cessation conversations—ones that not only motivate patients but also lead to cessation---often (but not always) require “the long view”. That is, success sometimes requires what I call the 4 R’s to success:

  • Relationships
  • Repetition
  • Resilience
  • Responsiveness

Putting Theory into Practice

This point came home to me this week during one of my morning clinic sessions. On my schedule was a middle aged African-American man with severe diabetes, a disease we had been struggling with together for many years. Management of his diabetes was made worse by the fact that his work as a security guard often involved night or “graveyard” shifts, making the timing of insulin administration challenging and even potentially unsafe. However, because of the strong synergies between tobacco use and diabetes with respect to early mortality (some studies suggest that the combination can reduce lifespan by as much as 18 years!), I always was mindful of the need to spend at least half of my visit focused on smoking cessation.

Because of my long-standing and trusting relationship with him, he was able to listen to my repeated advice without feeling judged and to respond in truthful ways that revealed the numerous barriers he felt to quitting, and the several issues that could be motivators to quit. One of his barriers had always been the fact that his wife also smoked. My gentle invitations to have her join him in his next visit with me were always rebuffed; I always made an effort to suggest that he share the 1-800-NO-BUTTS phone number with her.

For 8 years, our counseling sessions, while appearing to be authentically engaging, felt like they fell on deaf ears. He had never called the Helpline, had never filled the prescriptions I provided to him to aid with cessation, and had never set a quit date. Nevertheless, I remained resilient, mindful that nicotine addiction is a powerful foe, yet hopeful that this patient would be able to conquer this addiction under the right circumstances. So I did not give up, and I refused to get discouraged. Eighteen years is a lot of life to be saved. And this week, it happened -- albeit in a surprising way.

As we were closing our visit----one in which I did not bring up smoking cessation, as we were focused on his hypoglycemic episodes at night---he let me know that he had something to tell me. I already had my hand on the doorknob, and I had 3 patients waiting for me, so I was ambivalent about the idea of diving into another discussion. But I knew I needed to be responsive to him, a man usually of few words. He proudly told me he had finally called the Helpline. I was shocked, but delighted, and I took my hand off the doorknob, signaling to him that I was all ears. Then he also told me he just filled the prescription of the Nicotine Patch and pulled his collar down to show me that he was wearing a 21 mg patch right now. I practically swallowed my tears with my smile, and he smiled back.

“So what finally made you turn that corner?”,  I asked him. A long pause. His face changed, and his smile collapsed into a look of anguish. “My wife. She was just told that she has…cancer…..lung cancer, actually.  She’s been a smoker too y’know. Now I know I need to quit for her, because my smoking would be bad for her cancer. Plus, I need to quit so that I can be there for her when she needs me.”

I put my arm around his shoulder, feeling the patch under his T-shirt, and told him how sorry I was, but let him know that I was sure his making this effort meant a lot to her. He nodded and nodded, and I could see tears forming in the corners of his eyes.

Keep Up the Good Fight

Sometimes it takes a dramatic health event such as this one to shift patients’ motivation to quit to the next level. Other times it takes careful listening on the part of a clinician so as to identify inroads into motivation. But nearly always it requires the 4 R’s: Relationships (even brief ones can be meaningful), Repetition (do it again and again), Resilience (don’t get discouraged) and Responsiveness (listen to your patient and truly hear what they are saying).

Good luck out there. Keep up the fight. It is worth it.

Learn More

For more practical tips on how to motivate your patients and clients to quit smoking, please join Dr. Schillinger and Gary Tedeschi, PhD, Clinical Director for the California Smoker's Helpline for a free webinar on Friday, June 19th from noon to 1 pm to hear Top Tips for Motivating Patients to Quit:

Register Now!




About this Blog

The California Smokers' Helpline offers free, evidence-based tobacco cessation services in multiple languages to help smokers quit. We also offer free training and resources to health professionals to increase their knowledge and capacity for tobacco cessation.

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Contact Us

For more information about our free training and resources for health professionals, please contact the Helpline Communications Department at (858) 300-1010 or cshoutreach@ucsd.edu.